School Safety Fidelity: April 2017 Issue of School Safety Monthly Now Available

School Safety Fidelity

This month’s issue of school safety monthly is an interesting topic that spans all that we do in keeping our schools safe. While the concept is as fundamental as the all-hazards approach to emergency management, it is sometimes easy to forget the basics. School safety fidelity is as simple as making sure we do what we say we are going to do. This can manifest itself in different ways, from a failure to follow proscribed student supervision policies to the use of active shooter programs that breed inconsistency by design. Having practices, policies and training that are mismatched is one of the easiest ways to create liability and increase actual risk.

Room for improvement in school safety practices and procedures to enhance fidelity can be found in many areas. From basics like student supervision to more complex issues like active shooter response and mandatory reporting for child sexual abuse, mismatched policies and practices can cause injury and death when not addressed. In actuality, we should be taking a closer look at everything we do during the periodic review and updating of our plans.

The good news is that like most obstacles, this one can be overcome. There are a number of ways to identify gaps in school safety fidelity. There are also several ways to close these gaps and enhance school safety with sometimes very little actual effort. In many cases the answer is a simple adjustment of practice or training update. Read this month’s issue of School Safety Monthly: School Safety Fidelity to find out how.

Click the image below to download the April 2017 issue of School Safety Monthly:

School Safety Fidelity: April 2017

For past issues of School Safety Monthly as well as archived issues of our electronic journal The Safety Net, visit our newsletter archives page here:

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SafeTopics School Safety Training Videos Now Available Online

The “Netflix of School Safety”: CampusSafetyHQ offers Online School Safety Training Videos and more

As you may have read in Campus Safety magazine, there is a great new resource available for school safety trainers and educators. Over the years, the magazine has been more than just a publication and has put on some of the leading professional conferences in the industry. They have now taken their contributor’s expertise to the next level with Campus Safety HQ – bringing streaming school safety training videos to your computer or mobile device. These include content from a variety of experts – including our school safety training video library.

Campus Safety HQ logo

Campus Safety HQ

Try The First 30 Seconds scenario training series – and more – for $1

For a limited time, CampusSafetyHQ is offering a free trial for only $1 – a great value. Since we first released The First 30 Seconds in 2012, we have had a number of schools that want to use our crisis scenarios but either cannot use DVDs or cannot get purchasing approval for the full DVD set. This is a great opportunity to try out the videos in streaming format. This means you don’t need to carry DVDs or other materials with you. All you have to do is log on to any computer to access the training videos and school crisis scenarios. Show them on your laptop for staff evaluation exercises, or project them onto the big screen for group discussions. All the great resources that are in the DVD set are now available online for monthly subscribers at Campus Safety HQ for a limited time at only $1 for the first month and $47 per month after that.

More Online School Safety Videos added regularly

CampusSafetyHQ.com has a growing library of streaming content, including a collection of action plans on topics ranging from bomb threats to mental health recovery. Our school crisis scenario series The First 30 Seconds is now available and eventually the entire SafeTopics series will be available. This is a great option for someone who is looking for a variety of training for themselves and the organization as a whole. Take some time for your own professional development and watch a conference presentation from industry experts like Dr. Randy Atlas or Security Director Guy Grace. Then take that knowledge and train your staff with our school crisis scenario series. There are plenty of options for all employees and all levels of preparedness at Campus Safety HQ.

Check out this video from Campus Safety about the new resource:

Would you know a sex offender if you saw one?

As if you didn’t already have enough things to worry about, take a look at this chilling video from the state of Indiana. This is a sex offender training overview featuring interviews with investigators and a former teacher who was convicted of child sex abuse. Warning: This video is graphic in content and goes into detail about how this predator disguised himself so that he could abuse children. While there is no detailed sexual content the video can be disturbing for sensitive viewers.

Would you know a school sex offender? The Answer is “probably not”.

What should be the most alarming piece is the number of missed instances that the sexual predator describes. Each time someone would become suspicious, he would evade detection by being a diligent worker and respected colleague.  At one point he states – “It felt like a lot of stuff was ignored. A lot of stuff was ignored.”

Chuck Cohen of the Indiana State Police adds that in many cases, those who reported abuse were not sure if they should. He reported comments like “I almost didn’t call you – but I thought I should” in cases of real abuse that was prosecuted. And of course, we know that sex offenders come in all ages and can be male or female.

Here are some tips for educators from the video:

  • Educators who try to do their own investigation, determine victims or scope of abuse can quickly result in destroyed evidence.
  • Talking to the alleged victim or other students to determine “what actually happened” before reporting the incident can violate privacy and destroy evidence.
  • Confronting the alleged offender yourself can hinder the investigation later.
  • Talking to the alleged victim in front of the offender or interviewing the offender in front of the victim should NEVER be done.
  • Do not wait until you have absolute certainty – that will probably be too late.

Remember – if you are reading this, you are probably a Mandatory Reporter because of your job or state law. This means you are required to IMMEDIATELY report any suspicion to law enforcement or your states child protective agency. While this is often loosely defined, realize that even a short delay can allow further victimization to take place and evidence to be destroyed.

“Legally, if you do not report something you are required to report, you are committing a crime.”

The video also describes how most law enforcement investigations of suspected child abuse are low-key and designed to avoid disrupting the school environment. The best way to protect the victim’s privacy and to avoid violating the privacy of alleged offenders is to immediately notify law enforcement and let them handle the investigation.

Indiana Department of Education: Sexual Predator Awareness video

Warning: This video contains graphic information and detailed descriptions of sexual predator assaults:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8hxuISh6HIc